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Native ANT+ ... almost done

Update March 19th - USB1 and USB2 Garmin sticks now supported. Its now time to get that UI looking a little less 1980s and a bit more 2010 ... but with the work on configurable layouts already in the bag it shouldn't be too hard to do.

I've worked up the support for more speed, cadence and power as well as the original HR. Along the way I learned a lot more about the ANT and ANT+ protocols. It was relatively painless, well, except from wasting an hour or so debugging my speed sensor code only to find the wheel magnet had fallen off! (d'oh).

Gonna get to work on making the config a but sexier and testing on Windows and Mac, but the hard yards have been done. Big props to Mark Rages for sharing quarqd.


Oh, the reason Watts and RPM are zero above is because I jumped off the turbo to press the pause button so I could take the screenshot. You will see that cadence (blue) and power (yellow) had been registering... honest :) The speed is high because I have almost no resistance on the turbo to prevent me from working too hard as I tested. My usual guinea pigs (the kids) are now bored of Dad's turbo thing.

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